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About Us - The History of Kendall State Bank

1800’s 

The business association of William F. Hicks and Simon C. Gephart began in a stone building owned by Gephart, at the northeast corner of Sycamore and Louisa streets (present site of the Yehle home). Here, Mr. Hicks operated a hardware store. Later, two men began a loan business in the back room of the building. It was a successful venture.

Realizing other needs of the community, the two gentlemen established the Hicks, Gephart and Co. Bankers and Real Estate Brokers, a private bank, opening in March 1871. The bank was located on the southeast corner of Broadway and Walnut Streets (present site of Pastense-Pretense Antiques). The vault room and vault door that was used by the bank are still in place in the building, although each has undergone slight alterations.

Wm. C. Hicks died Aug. 13, 1878. He was replaced in the bank by his son, William F. Hicks.

Simon C. Gephart died Oct. 23, 1882, of apoplexy. Dr. Jesse T.B. Gephart replaced his father in the bank.

Wm. F. Hicks died Dec. 13, 1888. Dr. J.T.B. Gephart became the sole owner of the financial institution.

The Grasshopper Valley Bank was organized in early 1871, with M.P. Hillyer, proprietor. The bank was located on the southeast corner of Broadway and Sycamore, in a building erected by Hillyer (old Kendall State Bank building, now the Lowry and Johnson Law office). In 1875, the town name was changed to Valley Falls prompting Hillyer to change the name of the bank to the Valley Bank and Savings Institution. Bad economic conditions and liberal lending brought problems for the bank in 1878. On Jan. 27, 1879, the bank closed.

Rufus H. Crosby purchased the building, furniture, fixtures, and good will of the Valley Bank and Savings Institution Feb. 6, 1879.

The spring of 1856, Rufus Crosby and his brother William, began a dry goods store on the northwest corner of Sycamore and Louisa streets (present site of the Harry Leonard home). In 1866, Alvin D. Kendall began working in the Crosby store. He purchased William’s share of the business in 1868. The store name changed to Crosby and Kendall.
During 1879 and 1880, M.P. Hillyer erected a building at the northwest corner of Broadway and Sycamore streets (old Masonic building), to be used for his Delaware Valley Bank, which opened Oct. 2, 1880. M.P. Hillyer was president and H.D. Butts was cashier. The bank closed March 31, 1883.

In 1877, Crosby and Kendall moved their business to 423 Broadway (second building from southeast corner of Broadway and Walnut streets, formerly Gragg Recreation and Café). When Crosby purchased the Valley Bank and Savings Institution, he selected the name of the Valley Falls Bank of Deposit for his business and began operating from the counting room of the dry goods store. Within a short time, Crosby moved the bank business to the former Valley Bank and Savings building, retired from the store, leaving Kendall, who chose not to go into banking at that time, the sole proprietor. The store name was changed to A.D. Kendall’s. 

Rufus Crosby was found dead in the barn on the family homestead Dec. 29, 1891 (Crosby home was near the present home of Walter Bergsten).

A.D. Kendall purchased the Valley Falls Bank of Deposit Jan. 7, 1892.

Lida G. Goodrich began her career with the Valley Falls Bank of Deposit July 1892. When she was elected cashier, she was the first woman cashier of a bank in Kansas. 

Hicks, Gephart and Co. Bankers was granted a State Bank Charter June 21, 1897. The name was changed to the Citizens State Bank, with Dr. J.T.B. Gephart, president and John Coen, cashier. 

The Delaware Bank Inc. opened Sept. 1, 1889, with J.M. Piazzak, president; E.M. Hutchins, vice president; and H.D. Butts, cashier. The location was a room in the Masonic Building at 400 Broadway. The Delaware Bank Inc. closed Sept. 14, 1897, due to irregularities in accounts. Charges were brought against the cashier, but were later dropped. Complete restitution was made.

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The Grasshopper Valley Bank was organized 
in early 1871, with M.P. Hillyer, proprietor.

 

1900’s

In June 1900, the bank was incorporated and the name changed to the Kendall State Bank.

Ross W. Ferguson began his association with Kendall State Bank in 1920.

A.D. Kendall died May 11, 1923.

R.W. Ferguson became president of the Kendall State Bank, June 15, 1923.

The First National Bank opened for business Sept. 4, 1920, with George W. McCoy, president. The bank was located at 312 Broadway (now the vacant lot west of the Valley Falls Historical Society Museum and formerly the sight of the Valley Falls Vindicator).

The bank flourished until the late 1920’s, when hard times were beginning to prevail.

The Citizens State Bank moved to the Masonic building Aug. 25, 1903. 
Dr. Gephart died Aug. 12, 1927, and was succeeded as president of the bank by his son Charles T. Gephart, who has been cashier since January 1907.

Failing eyesight prompted Charles Gephart to retire in 1947. 

F.F. Hurst became president of the bank Jan. 6, 1947.

 

Rufus H. Crosby purchased the building, 
furniture, fixtures, and good will of the 
Valley Bank and Savings Institution 
Feb. 6, 1879.

 

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A.D. Kendall purchased the Valley Falls 
Bank of Deposit Jan. 7, 1892.

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H.D. Wyatt entered the Citizens State Bank Aug. 1, 1947, and was elected vice president and cashier. In October 1947, the board made application to the FDIC for insurance on depositor’s accounts.

During 1955, a new bank building was erected at 406 Broadway, opening for business in the new location Dec. 3, 1955. (Two buildings west of the Masonic building).

F.F. Hurst died Sept. 1, 1956.

H.D. Wyatt was elected president of the Citizens State Bank Oct. 9, 1956.

On Jan. 15, 1965, the board of directors voted to approve a merger of the Citizens State Bank to the Kendall State Bank. Approval was received April 15, 1965, with the actual consolidation occurring April 24, 1965. Safe deposit boxes were also moved to the Kendall State Bank.

The First National Bank opened 
for business Sept. 4, 1920

The stockholders agreed, with one dissent, to liquidate the First National Bank. The assets were absorbed by the Kendall State Bank July 7, 1931.

April 15, 1946, application for membership in the FDIC was made. Approval was effective Aug. 16, 1946.

H.D. Wyatt was employed Jan. 16, 1947. Wyatt resigned Aug. 1, 1947, having purchased an interest in the Citizens State Bank.

Robert E. Simpson was hired as a teller, Aug. 1, 1947. He was elected a director Jan. 11, 1949.

Lida G. Goodrich retired Jan. 10, 1959, after a career of 67 years with Kendall State Bank.

Florence Bill, assistant cashier, retired Oct. 1, 1963 after almost 45 years with the bank.

Robert E. Simpson was elected president of the Kendall State Bank in June 1964.

Kendall State Bank and Citizens State Bank were consolidated April 24, 1965.

Ross W. Ferguson died April 15, 1970.

Robert E. Simpson resigned Sept. 14, 1970
September 17, 1970, H.D. Wyatt purchased controlling interest in the bank and assumed the presidency.

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Throughout the years, the bank acquired 
two business buildings east of the Kendall 
State Bank and by 1973 occupied three 
buildings on the southeast corner of Broadway 
and Sycamore streets.

Duane M. Stoskopf and Geraldine Hollingsworth purchased the controlling interest in the Kendall State Bank Dec. 5, 1970. Duane M. Stoskopf was elected President and Chief Executive Officer. Management duties were to begin Feb. 1, 1971.

Throughout the years, the bank acquired two business buildings east of the Kendall State Bank and by 1973 occupied three buildings on the southeast corner of Broadway and Sycamore streets.

From 1965 through 1975, Kendall State Bank purchased all the business buildings on the northeast half block of Fourth and Broadway. A new bank building was erected on the grounds in 1975, opening in the new location Nov. 11, 1975.

 

   

The Kendall State Bank purchased 
the failed Bank of Nortonville, May 
1, 1986 and opened as a branch of 
the Kendall State Bank May 2, 1986.

The Kendall State Bank purchased the failed Bank of Nortonville, May 1, 1986 and opened as a branch of the Kendall State Bank May 2, 1986.

Kendall State Bank was allowed to purchase the bank under a new state law that allows branch banking in one-bank towns where the bank has failed. The branch bank law was signed into effect in March of 1986 by Gov. John Carlin and Kendall State Bank was only the second bank to take advantage of it.

A newly constructed building in Winchester opened as the second branch of the Kendall State Bank Jan. 25, 1988. The community has not had its own bank since the Bank of Winchester was closed by its directors Aug. 5, 1932.

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The 100th anniversary of the 
Kendall State Bank is celebrated 
in the month of August, 1992.


The 100th anniversary of the Kendall State Bank is celebrated in the month of August, 1992. Lobby displays of antique furniture, old bank records, and photographs were on display at the three branches. Two performances of the “Kendall Follies” and a picnic supper was held Aug. 23 at the Delaware Township Hall.

July of 1995, Steven M. Stoskopf succeeds his father as president of the Kendall State Bank, while Duane M. Stoskopf who became president in 1972, is named chairman of the board and chief executive officer.

July 1996, the Kendall State Bank has applied to the State Banking Department and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation to establish a branch in the Johnson County vicinity.

Marilyn Marye announces her retirement in January 1998 after being employed by Kendall State Bank for 25 years.

May 1998, Jayne Coleman is elected President of the Kendall State Bank. She succeeds her brother, Steve, who is elected chairman of the board and chief executive officer and replaces his father, Duane who is retiring and was elected chairman of the board emeritus.

An ATM (Automated Teller Machine) was introduced into the Valley Falls community courtesy of the Kendall State Bank in July 1998.

An Office Suite in Overland Park, is the temporary beginning of the 4th branch of the Kendall State Bank. A new building is being planned and drawn on paper and hoping to be built by the end of the year 1999.

Darlene Glassel, Assistant Vice President has announced her retirement in July 1999, although she will work part-time at the bank until the end of the year. Darlene has been with the Kendall State Bank for over 25 years.

A mobile unit was set to house the Kendall State Bank Branch facility in the Overland Park area, which took the place of the Office Suite. A permanent building is being started and is planning on being finished by the end of year 2000. 

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A mobile unit was set to house the Kendall 
State Bank Branch facility in the Overland 
Park area, which took the place of the 
Office Suite.

 

2000’s

The Kendall State Bank Community Hall, formerly “Western Auto”, was created and will be used for Dances, Reunions, and Receptions for the public. 

September 2000: Kendall State Bank introduces Internet Banking as the “future of banking.” The Internet has been a fast-growing world-wide tool, that people of all ages use daily. Internet Banking will be new in our area, but Kendall State Bank strives to continue to be a leader in services that will enhance and contribute to its communities.

January 19, 2001:  Kendall State Bank sold the Overland Park Branch to 1st Financial Bank.  Along with losing the branch, Kendall State Bank also lost 2 of their longtime employees that decided to pursue opportunities to work for 1st Financial Bank, Daniel Meehan and Steven Stoskopf.

January 2003:  As soon as you thought the future could hold no more surprises for Kendall State Bank and it's customers, Kendall State Bank introduces Check Image where the customer receives their original statement and a "picture" of all of their checks on a convenient page to be placed in a Kendall State Bank custom folder, compliments of Kendall State Bank.  Customers no longer receive their original checks back in their statement....  


…TO BE CONTINUED